Arizona Federal District Judge Denies Injunction Against Arizona Poll Watching Group, DOJ Disagrees

On Oct. 28, U.S. District Judge Michael Liburdi denied a request to block a poll-watching group from surveilling drop boxes citing First Amendment concerns. Three days later, the Department of Justice signaled its disapproval of the judge’s ruling in a statement of interest, stating that "The First Amendment does not protect individuals’ right to assemble to engage in voter intimidation or coercion.”

Connecticut Jury Awards Sandy Hook Plaintiffs $965 Million in Damages for a Decade of Harassment

Conspiracy theorist and Sandy Hook-denier Alex Jones owes $965 million in defamation and emotional distress damages to the families of eight Sandy Hook victims and an FBI agent, a Connecticut jury decided Wednesday. The ruling comes just weeks after Jones was ordered to pay nearly $50 million in damages to a pair of Sandy Hook parents in a separate trial in Texas in August.

NRA Free Speech Lawsuit Dismissed Against NY State Financial Regulator

The National Rifle Association claimed that a New York state financial regulator coerced and threatened banks and insurers to sever business relationships with the gun group, according to the 2018 lawsuit, which claimed the regulator's "intent [was] to obstruct, chill, deter, and retaliate against the NRA’s core political speech." But, a federal appeals court recently found that the regulator's actions were done in "good faith" and dismissed the complaint.

A Social Media Censorship Law is Upheld in Texas, Lyrissa Lidsky Weighs In

First Amendment lawyer Lyrissa Lidsky weighs in on a recently upheld social media censorship law in Texas that would bar platforms with more than 50 million users from removing content with political viewpoints. A different circuit court in Florida filed a preliminary injunction against a similar law. Since both federal appeals courts disagreed, only the Supreme Court can decide if the platforms have a First Amendment right to censor, or if they don’t.

Utah Professor Sues University Over Required Pronoun Use, Argues Free Speech Infringement

Richard Bugg, a theater professor at Southern Utah University filed the lawsuit in the United States District Court for the District of Utah Aug. 31. Bugg, represented by attorney Jerry Mooney with financial support from the FIRE Faculty Legal Defense Fund, argues that he is “opposed to the coercion of speech that is taking place on our campus and on most campuses,” the lawsuit stated.

Sandy Hook Families Demand Probe into Alex Jones-Owned Company’s Bankruptcy Filing

The motion, filed Aug. 25 in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court of the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division, says Jones has “systematically transferred millions of dollars” to himself and relatives, despite the company filing for bankruptcy to allegedly avoid paying damages to the families. In a response filed Aug. 28, Jones’ attorneys state that the families’ “motion is brimming with inaccuracies and allegations that have no basis in fact.”

Yes, You Can Get Paid For Being A Family Caregiver. Here's How

Being Patient spoke with Sima Schoen from the Family Caregivers Alliance about one of her most frequently asked questions: “Can I get paid for being a family caregiver?” Millions of Americans live with Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia — and millions more take care of them. By 2050, cases of Alzheimer’s are expected to triple, meaning millions more children, other family members, and friends may find themselves with a new job that can take many hours each week.

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